what to fix first?

Here‘s yet another classic example of Laurent Bossavit’s very clear thinking leading to simple and elegant results.

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three ks

When it comes to process change, three Ks spring to mind. One of the many interpretations of the Hopi Indian word koyaanisqatsi is ‘a state of being that requires a change of state’. This is the trigger that the team has a process problem to solve. And the Japanese word kaizen (from the world of Lean Thinking) means gradual, continual change for the better. This is what the outside world would see if it could somehow map the team’s practices over a period of time. And of course right at the beginning, as soon as a team is empowered to design its own process in this way and allows itself to enjoy the freedom that this brings, the first few changes are likely to be relatively dramatic and close together: this is kaikaku (radical improvement), again Japanese and again from lean thinking.

selling agile

The more I think about it, the more convinced I become that selling agile at all is a mistake. Certainly as a coach/manager, what interests me most is the ‘process’ side of things, and agile is always an interesting and rewarding approach for both me and (I hope) the software team. But what interests my bosses is more often the business value delivered to the user base.

I’ve never been someone who believed that it works to simply plonk a methodology onto a team straight from a book. Every team is different, and every business is different; enforcing conformance to some pre-determined monolith is likely to bring out as many minuses as plusses. And I believe that’s true of the agile methods just as much as it is of the heavyweight ones. What’s more, the successes I’ve been associated with have all been due entirely to having the team grow their own processes – gradually, incrementally making the changes required by the current situation. Only when the current way of working is shown to fall short in some respect does the team call a review and work out a different approach. There is never any change simply for the sake of it.

Of course the agile movement directs and informs my thinking, and hence my coaching and management styles. And all of the teams I’ve coached have become increasingly agile over time, without any of them ever consciously adopting a ‘book’ method. The stakeholders get to learn that iterative and incremental delivery is better for everyone, that feedback loops must be short, that quality helps the team go faster, etc etc. But most will never hear the words ‘agile’, ‘SCRUM’ or ‘extreme’.

In the future though, I do expect I’ll be using the word ‘lean’ a lot…

everything in its place

A couple of weeks ago I finished reading Gemba Kaizen by Masaaki Imai. Just like all the other books on lean manufacturing, I found it extremely rewarding and thought-provoking, while at the same time being somewhat longer and more repetitive than I might have wished (the second half comprises an interminable list of case studies, many of which add very little to the value of the book).

The main idea I took away from the book was that of 5S. This is basically rigorous and institutionalised house-keeping (translated as Sort, Straighten, Scrub, Systematize, Standardize). The idea is that an untidy or disorganised workplace can contribute significantly to reducing the throughput of value for the customer.

Can this concept be applied to software development? I believe so. All our tools have to be readily accessible when needed. Our codebase, workspace and CM system should all be well-organised, and should contain nothing that isn’t needed to add value or promote flow. Our build should be clean and automated, and driven only from components that are CM-controlled. And when we’re working as a team, all our processes and techniques should be standardized so that each person’s actions are understandable by all.
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