Connascence of Algorithm revisited

Last time I fixed two instances of Connascence of Algorithm. Then I realised that I had introduced some more, so I fixed that too. After I had put that post to bed I also noticed that I had missed some alternative solutions. This article puts that right.

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Connascence of Algorithm

This is the fourth post in a series in which I am test-driving a classic code kata, and using only the rules of connascence to tell me what to refactor.

If you have been following along, you’ll recall that my most recent refactor was to create a new domain object for MultiBuyDiscount, thereby alleviating a nasty case of Connascence of Position. The tests pass, so let’s review what connascence remains in this code:

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Connascence of Position

This is part three of a series in which I am test-driving a classic code kata, and using only the rules of connascence to tell me what to refactor. Last time I continued working on the checkout kata, and I fixed some Connascence of Meaning by introducing a new class to represent the domain concept of Money. Today I want to take that same code a little further to explore what happens when I continue simply responding to the connascence I see.

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Connascence of Meaning

This is part 2 of a short series of posts in which I explore TDD using only connascence as my guide. In the previous article I wrote a test, made it pass, and then refactored away the strongest coupling. That coupling took the form of some Connascence of Value between the test and the Checkout. Later, after the excitement of publishing the post had died away, I realised there was still some non-trivial connascence in the code. Today it’s time to fix that.

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Connascence of Value

Connascence is a way of describing the coupling between different parts of a codebase. And because it classifies the relative strength of that coupling, connascence can be used as a tool to help prioritise what should be refactored first. This is the first in a short series of posts in which I test-drive a well-known kata, attempting to use only connascence as my guide during refactoring.

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Date arithmetic

This morning I got up at eight minutes past six. So what, you ask? Well, that means I got out of bed at 06:08 10/12/14*, which is a very nice arithmetic progression. That is, today’s date is a series of numbers with a constant difference (in this case, the constant difference is 2).

Question: Which dates (and times, if you wish) next year will form arithmetic progressions? And which, if any, will form a geometric progression (in which each term after the first is found by multiplying its predecessor by a fixed constant)?

*Unless you live in the US — in which case, pretend today is October 12th.