Choosing what to measure

Suppose we want metrics that help us write “better” code — what does “better” mean? I’m going to fall back on Extreme Normal Form, more commonly known as the four rules of Simple Design. These say that our priorities, in order, when choosing what to improve are that the code should:

  1. be correct and complete
  2. express the design clearly
  3. express every concept once and only once
  4. be small

Let’s agree to call code that meets these criteria “habitable code”, in that it is easier to understand and maintain than uninhabitable code. How can we design a metric that rewards the creation of habitable code?

Now it seems to me that most teams have processes in place for ensuring correctness and completeness. These might be requirements traceability procedures, suites of (manual or automated) tests, QA procedures, user testing, focus groups, etc etc. The first rule of simple design helps to ensure that we are only working on valid code, but doesn’t help us differentiate “better” code. Only the remaining three rules can help us with that. In a sense, the first rule can be taken as a “given” when our projects are set up with appropriate QA processes and procedures in place. I will therefore not consider test coverage when searching for a metric (indeed I believe that test coverage is an unhelpful measure in the context of code habitability).

Let’s move on to the second rule of Simple Design. Joe Rainsberger re-casts this rule as No bad names, because in the huge majority of current programming languages the names we give to variables, functions, classes etc are our primary (often only) means of expression in the code. I believe it is impossible to directly measure how well code expresses intent, or whether the names chosen are “good” in any aesthetic sense. But the beauty, coherence and honesty of the names chosen by the programmer is only one aspect of applying this rule. Implicit in the statement “No bad names” is the notion that the programmer has chosen to give names to the “correct” set of entities. That is, choosing the things to reify and name in the code is at least as important as, if not more important than, choosing the best name to give those things.

This is where rules 2 and 3 begin to trip over each other (and perhaps why some authors place them in the opposite order). Consider for example the Primitive Obsession code smell. This occurs when two different classes communicate using (messages containing parameters of) primitive types (string, integer, array etc). The primitive(s) used for the message parameter(s) represent some domain concept that must be known to both classes; but this code is smelly because both classes must also understand the particular representation chosen for that concept in this particular message. The two classes exhibit Connascence of Meaning, and the third rule of Simple Design is violated because the representation of the domain concept is understood in two different places in the code. But we could also consider this to be a violation of rule 2, because that domain concept has not been reified into a class and named — we have a missing name.

Based solely on this type of logic, I am therefore going to boldly assert that any metric that gives a good indication of the degree to which rule 3 is followed, will also be a good indication of how well rule 2 is followed (allowing for the fact that we cannot measure aesthetics). So as a proxy measure I claim we can focus solely on the Once And Only Once rule as a measure of the habitability of our code.

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One thought on “Choosing what to measure

  1. Pingback: How to measure habitability | silk and spinach

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