blame

This week I’ve come across a few articles that clicked together as I read them, and in so doing they reinforced one of my deepest beliefs about software development – or any other profession, for that matter. The articles were:

  • Train Wreck Management by Mary Poppendieck, in which Mary chronicles the origins of “management” and “accountability”. It seems that hierarchical management structures were first applied in the mistaken belief that it was one person’s dereliction that caused a train crash, and that in future such things could be prevented by management and accountability. Lean thinking says the opposite – that the train crash was an inevitable consequence of the structure of the system, and that specific individuals should not be blamed.
  • Survey Blames Blame for Lean Struggles by Mark Graban, in which Mark notices that a recent survey seems to indicate that employees blame each other for their business failing to adopt lean thinking. Mark’s subsequent analysis of the survey shows, however, that it seems to lead the participants to ask “who is responsible for…?” – so it should be no surprise that the top answers mostly involve job titles! Mark’s response is to design a new survey in “5-whys” style – an effort I applaud, even though I disliked the example embedded in the survey.
  • Risk Aversity by Henrik MÃ¥rtensson, in which Henrik uses the Theory of Constraints thinking tools to dig into why many organisations are immune to change. One of the root causes, according to Henrik, is that “mistakes” are punished in the average workplace – and so after a while everyone becomes afraid to innovate, or even to change the status quo. A truly lean organisation will reward even the person who makes a change that leads to lower throughput, because at least they contributed, and knowledge about the whole system has been improved as a result. But even the use of the word “mistake” shows how deep-seated is our culture’s desire to blame, and hence to discourage.
  • The Secret Sauce of Highly Productive Software Development by Amr Elssamadisy and Deb Hartmann, in which the authors propose that inability to learn is the bottleneck (in the Goldratt / TOC sense) in most software teams. I need to think about their “bottleneck” claim, but I do agree that learning is the key to agile success, and that a learning organisation will out-perform any other in the longer term.
  • The QnEK Horse has left the Barn by Hal Macomber, in which Hal opens the lid on a community for sharing QnEK (Quick-n-Easy Kaizen) ideas. QnEK can only succeed in an organisation where “mistakes” don’t exist, where blame is replaced by systemic learning.

For me, these articles all dovetail:

  • learning is the key to long-term success
  • the system can always be improved
  • systemic learning requires a constant flow of improvement suggestions
  • blame discourages innovation

It seems clear to me that blame itself lies at the root of many organisations’ problems. The system can always be improved, and is always the source of problems. People should be rewarded for discovering those problems and trying to fix them, especially when they “only” create new knowledge about how to perform less well.

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