An event-sourcing conundrum

I have a side project that I use as a sounding board to help me learn about “modern stuff”. The front end is built with React + Flux, and the back end persists information via event sourcing instead of a SQL or document database. I’m enjoying the experience of working with these tools, and so far everything has gone smoothly. But now I have a puzzle, which I will share here in the hope that one of you can point me in a good direction.

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Red, green … what now?!

This month James Jeffries and I ran a session at Agile Manchester in which we (ie. Jim) live-coded Dave Thomas‘s Back to the Checkout kata. The twist was that during TDD’s “refactor” step we used only connascence to decide what to change.

(I know I’ve done that before, on this blog. But this time Jim and I started with different tests. And we practiced a bit first. So the resulting refactoring steps are quite different than those I wrote about earlier.)

@ruby_gem kindly pointed her laptop at the screen and recorded the session. (The beauty of this setup is that you get to see what Jim types and hear how we explain it, but you don’t have to suffer from seeing either of us.)

The slides we used are on slideshare, and I’ve uploaded the resulting video to youtube for you to view at your leisure. Comments welcome, as always.

Connascence of Value: a different approach

Recently I wrote a series of posts in which I attempted to drive a TDD episode purely from the point of view of connascence. But as I now read over the articles again, it strikes me that I made some automatic choices. I explicitly called out my design choices in some places, while elsewhere I silently used experience to choose the next step. So here, I want to take another look at the very first step I took.

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Peculiar algorithms

Am I over-thinking things with this Checkout TDD example? Or is there a real problem here?

Based on insightful input from Pawel and Ross, it is clear to me (now) that there is CoA between the currentBalance() method and the special offer object(s), because the method doesn’t give those objects any opportunity to make final adjustments to the amount of discount they are prepared to offer.

However, as things stand there is no requirement demanding that. Does that still mean the connascence exists? Or is it a tree falling in the forest, with no tests around to hear it?

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Connascence: a mis-step

I had a very interesting discussion today with Ross about my recent connascence/TDD posts. Neither of us was happy about either of the solutions to the corruption problem with the special offer object. Even with the cloning approach, it still seems that both the Checkout and the MultiBuyDiscount have to collude in avoiding the issue; if either gets it wrong, the tests will probably fail.

After a few minutes, we realised that the root of the problem arises from the MultiBuyDiscount having state, and we began to cast around for alternatives. At some point it dawned on me that the origins of the problem go right back to the first article and the first couple of refactorings I did.

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Connascence of Algorithm

This is the fourth post in a series in which I am test-driving a classic code kata, and using only the rules of connascence to tell me what to refactor.

If you have been following along, you’ll recall that my most recent refactor was to create a new domain object for MultiBuyDiscount, thereby alleviating a nasty case of Connascence of Position. The tests pass, so let’s review what connascence remains in this code:

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Connascence of Position

This is part three of a series in which I am test-driving a classic code kata, and using only the rules of connascence to tell me what to refactor. Last time I continued working on the checkout kata, and I fixed some Connascence of Meaning by introducing a new class to represent the domain concept of Money. Today I want to take that same code a little further to explore what happens when I continue simply responding to the connascence I see.

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